Women’s Racing

I was running a little late, so were others.  At nearly 6pm Carol was gathering everyone to decide on boats.  Wind looked great to me for the 420’s, that was my vote, but Carol was cautioning everyone that over the last hour winds had been gusting to 30mph at the MIT dock and that a number of high-school sailors had capsized and had trouble righting the boats.  It was enough to make people shy away from the 420s.  In fairness, the water is still chilly and a capsize wouldn’t be fun whether you could right the boat easily or not.

We sailed the Ideal 18’s.  We had five of these and over 20 women racers so that meant four people to a boat and a couple of people sitting out on the committee boat.  I got the tiller.  On my boat, to start with anyway, was Laura, Jasmine, and Tessa.  Laura is experienced with women’s racing and was valuable in the front of the boat, both at helping Jasmine and Tessa and at being an extra set of eyes for me, saving us from disasters more than once.  The jib is pretty easy on the Ideal but I think Jasmine with just a green rating was learning from it.  This is my point that you learn at a rate in proportion to the wind.  With the strong wind, even the little self-tacking jib of the Ideal was giving lots of feedback.  I let Tessa trim the main the whole time.  She had some experience in bigger boats and so seemed totally unfazed at the boat heeling which was really good.

Lessons.  Hmm, first lesson is to eat something before.  Racing runs right across dinner time, and you can run out of energy.  Today I had missed lunch and so grabbed a snack on the way to CBI.  It made a huge difference.  I felt better and hand more energy.

Another thing that went well was once on a final leg to the finish.  We rounded the leeward mark pretty far behind other boats and looking for anything to try, I saw darker water on the left side and tacked over for it.  Sure enough, the stronger wind was there.  I sailed in it for a bit on starboard, then tacked in it on lay for the finish.  Amazingly we crossed two boats just before the line.  The first boat we crossed was complaining loudly about port-starboard but we got across without them having to alter course.

A thing that didn’t go well also involved a boat complaining.  Approaching the leeward mark, the boat behind hailed overlap.  This surprised me, I turned and looked and sure enough they were no where close to overlap.  But in that second or two when I was turning and looking, we came up on the mark and there was no longer time to prepare my crew for a tight tactical rounding.  We went wide of the mark and the other boat went inside to pass us.  Now, it’s possible to fluster someone by yelling.  Doing so deliberately in attempt to gain advantage might even be considered not fair sailing.  But that’s not what was going on here.  I wasn’t flustered, all that happened was I was delayed for a second.  When I watch racing on the internet, I think I see the professional sailors do this to each other.  They will hail or otherwise posture in some way that consumes some time or attention of the other boat.  Every second spent evaluating the immediate situation is a second unavailable for planning the next situation.  I think the best defenses are to have that next situation planned as early as possible, be aware of the current situation as much as possible, and possibly anticipate noise from the other boat so that if it comes you can dismiss it faster.

After racing I had a little sip of coke left, I drank a bottle of water, then another bottle of water with a cookie and was feeling okay.  I have to give a lot of credit to Tessa for doing the work of pulling the main sheet for me.  Otherwise I would have been demolished tired.

95F, CBI wind records show 10kts gusting to 20, starting WSW but then backing to SSW.  This wind shift was most apparent on the third leg of our triangle course as it turned the reach into a run.  In earlier races we jibed around the reach mark then reached to the leeward mark.  In later races we jibed but then had trouble fetching.  In a couple of races we had to throw in an extra pair of jibes.  In one race I avoided the extra jibes by sailing past the reach mark so that we could fetch the leeward mark with a single jibe.

Oh, and we didn’t even win a single race but we sure had fun.

 

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